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Black Activism and Resistance in the 21st Century

Georgia Tech resources on Black activism and social issues in the 21st century.

Brief resources on housing, activism, and the Black community

The short video below helps you get an understanding of the wealth and housing gap for Black communities. 


The St. Louis Fed’s Center for Household Financial Stability looks at the relationship between wealth and different demographic characteristics: race or ethnicity, education, and age or birth year. [This] demographic lens is more informative than looking at wealth by income bands, because while income can (and frequently does) change from year to year, demographics are more stable.

For decades, policy and debate around the roots of racial inequality in America were based on an official government report from the 1960s. That report blamed poverty on the "unstable" structure of Black families and, more specifically, families headed by Black women. Brookings Institution fellow Dr. Andre Perry published a fresh analysis of the state of Black America in his book Know Your Price. Based on extensive research and data, he redefines the term, "Devalued Assets." And, unlike the old report, Perry's book argues that Black women aren't the problem — they're actually the solution.



In-depth research on housing, activism, and the Black community

The books linked below will give you in-depth information on the effects of systemic racism on housing and urban planning. The short resources above this list will help you understand the complex topics included. Further resources can be found in the Georgia Tech Library catalog


Atlanta-specific resources

Atlanta, the epitome of the New South, is a city whose economic growth has transformed it from a provincial capital to a global city, one that could bid for and win the 1996 Summer Olympics. Yet the reality is that the exceptional growth of the region over the last twenty years has exacerbated inequality, particularly for African Americans. This is explored in-depth in Atlanta: Race, class, and urban expansion.

More than any other major U.S. city, Atlanta regularly reinvents itself. From the Civil War's devastation to the 1996 Olympic boom to the current housing crisis, the city's history is a cycle of rise and fall, ruin and resurgence. In Planning Atlanta two dozen planning practitioners and thought leaders bring the story to life.

Broader resources on wealth and housing

 Black Stats is a comprehensive guide filled with contemporary facts and figures on African Americans. With fascinating and often surprising information on everything from incarceration rates, lending practices, and the arts to marriage, voting habits, and green jobs, the contextualized material in this book will better attune readers to telling trends while challenging commonly held, yet often misguided, perceptions. 

At a time when America is at a precipice of a racial awakening, it is important to provide empirical research on a set of problems that if solved, can significantly improve the racial wealth gap. This study from the Brookings Institute explores data to make policy recommendations.